Apple launches 'set it and forget it' Search Ads Basic for the App Store

Apple says it will bring more installs with less effort “at a predictable cost.” That’s how the company is pitching its new Search Ads Basic offering.

Apple rolled out Search Ads for the App Store in September 2016. Since that time, Apple has seen significant adoption by developers seeking to drive app downloads. Search Ads Basic is a simplified version of Search Ads that eliminates keywords and bidding.

Apple won’t appreciate this analogy, but it’s kind of like AdWords Express for the App Store. Search Ads Basic is designed for developers who don’t have the time, interest or expertise to manage search campaigns. Currently, it’s available for the US only.

However, Search Ads is available in selected non-US markets, so over time, we can probably expect it to go international. The current product now becomes “Search Ads Advanced.” Beyond the differences in bidding and keywords, the two have different dashboards, with simplified data available for Basic and more granular data available with Advanced.

To get started with Basic, you specify a monthly budget and a cost-per-install (CPI) maximum. As with Search Ads Advanced, Apple generates the creative.

Using its data and analytics, Apple will recommend a CPI amount, but developers can set their own. Regardless, the company will seek to optimize campaigns to bring the actual cost in under the daily CPI. Apple is offering a $100 credit for new campaigns.

Users pay only for taps (clicks). I was told that Apple is seeing a very high average conversion rate of 50 percent. However, some campaigns perform even better. The company also indicated that many developers are achieving CPIs of less than $1.50 and some well below $0.50.

The move toward greater simplification is also happening at Google. Earlier this year, the company decided to turn all app-install campaigns into Universal App Campaigns.

Google facing $1 billion in potential liability with UK class action

In 2012, Google paid $22.5 million to settle an FTC claim that the company “misrepresented to users of Apple Inc.’s Safari Internet browser that it would not place tracking cookies or serve targeted ads to those users . . .” The company bypassed Safari’s cookie-blocking settings, it said, to deliver a “signed-in” user experience.

Google explained that it “used known Safari functionality to provide features that signed-in Google users had enabled,” adding that “advertising cookies do not collect personal information.” Critics took a more skeptical view.

This same conduct is now the subject of a class action lawsuit in the UK. The potential UK class includes 5.4 million people who owned iPhones between June 2011 and February 2012. Google’s hypothetical liability in the matter could exceed $1 billion — considerably higher than the settlement in the US action.

The UK lawsuit is being framed as a privacy case about the “misuse of personal data.” Google says that it believes the suit is meritless and will contest it.

The group pursuing the case is called “Google You Owe Us.” On the group’s website it makes the following statements about the case, called a “representative action” in the UK:

We believe that Google took millions of iPhone users’ personal information illegally in 2011 and 2012. Google did this by bypassing default privacy settings on the iPhone’s Safari browser . . .

We want to ensure that big companies like Google respect our privacy in the future. Our personal information is valuable and it must be used it in a way that is trustworthy and fair.

This case can be seen in the broader context of European privacy complaints against US internet companies. Google and Facebook specifically have been the subject of numerous complaints in different countries.

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation is coming in May, which will create strict new privacy rules and significant potential liability (millions of euros) for companies that fail to comply or violate its provisions.

Report: Smart speaker owners increasingly using them instead of typing or swiping

Unlike VR headsets or wearables, smart speakers are rapidly emerging as a mass market technology platform. The latest to document relatively high satisfaction and usage of these devices is call-tracking and analytics company Invoca.

Earlier this year, Invoca surveyed 1,000 people in the US who own an Amazon Echo or Google Home device. The survey asked questions about current behavior and a range of hypothetical scenarios.

The company found that people use smart speakers more frequently over time, with 89 percent using them daily. Here’s a more detailed usage breakdown:

33 percent of owners said they used the devices more than five times daily.28 percent used them four to five times a day.24 percent used them two to three times a day.

In addition, 58 percent of respondents said that they used assistants to “accomplish tasks they used to do through typing or swiping.” So there’s some substitution going on, and there’s apparently an appetite for more.

By some estimates, Amazon controls 70 to 75 percent of the smart speaker market in the US. But the Invoca survey found that people were open to devices from other companies not yet in the market, especially Facebook. Nearly 60 percent (58 percent) of survey respondents said they would potentially buy a voice assistant from the social network if it sold one. (Facebook is rumored to be working on such a device.)

Invoca also reports that 73 percent of respondents said they’d made a purchase through a voice assistant, and 39 percent said interaction with these devices had influenced purchases made elsewhere. (I’m skeptical of the accuracy of the 73 percent figure.)

One of the more interesting findings: Invoca also discovered some receptiveness to ads on these devices, provided users had a degree of control or they were personalized in some fashion. Currently, there are no ads on Google Home or Alexa devices, though promotional audio messages are likely to arrive at some point. Earlier this year, Amazon shut down such an attempt by third-party analytics company VoiceLabs.

The report also explored tasks or activities that were being pursued by device owners in several vertical contexts: banking, travel and healthcare. Here were the top three smart speaker objectives or activities reported in each category:

Travel

    Inquire about hotels.Check flight status.Purchase or book something.

Banking

    Check a balance.Pay a bill.Track spending.

Healthcare

    Ask about symptoms.Ask about health/diet tips.Connect with hospital or doctor.

Survey respondents were not without some criticisms and complaints, mostly having to do with being comprehended, the length of conversations they could have and the complexity of tasks they could execute.

About 90 percent of owners said that if they’re unable to get what they’re seeking from the smart speaker they turn to search. And 76 percent said that they would like to be able to connect with a human through the device, as a backup, if it was unable to answer their question.

After the smoke from holiday 2017 clears, we could discover as many as 50 or 60 million smart speakers installed in US households.

How marketers in 25 industries use call tracking to drive revenue from search

When smartphone users run searches for businesses and engage with their digital ads and website, they often convert by calling. And those phone calls convert to revenue 10x more than web leads.

Marketers must now take a data-driven approach to call conversions to optimize ROI. To do it, businesses and agencies are using call tracking solutions. Call tracking enables marketers to generate better converting calls, decrease their cost per lead, personalize customer experiences and drive growth.

If you are interested in learning how businesses and agencies use call tracking, this e-book from DialogTech is for you. It explains the importance of call conversions to marketing ROI and tells the stories of how marketers in 25 industries use call tracking to drive revenue.

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “The Marketer’s Big Book of Call Tracking Success Stories.”

Mobile-first updates from SMX East

As every SEO knows, the rise of mobile searches has prompted Google to prioritize mobile signals in determining search results. To that end, the search giant is in the slow-going process of rolling out its mobile-first index, which is expected to be fully implemented sometime next year.

In the meantime, getting sites ready is a high-priority item on SEOs’ to-do lists, which is why the topic was addressed at this week’s SMX East conference in a panel discussion titled, “SEO For Google’s Mobile-First Index & Mobile-Friendly World.” The speakers included Leslie To, director of SEO for 3Q Digital; Ashley Berman Hale, director of SEO at Local SEO Guide; and Gary Illyes, webmaster trends analyst for Google.

Today’s post will cover the key points presented in this panel.

Leslie To: Is it the year of mobile yet?

Leslie To breaks down the process of preparing for the mobile-first index into two major categories:

    Configuration-agnostic auditingConfiguration-based auditing

Configuration-based auditing would involve those things you need to do that are specific to your mobile configuration (whether that’s a mobile subdomain, dynamic serving or responsive web design).

Configuration-agnostic auditing, on the other hand, involves items you need to address regardless of your mobile configuration, and this is what To covered first.

Configuration-agnostic auditing

Let’s start with a summary look at what matters regardless of mobile configuration:

Tips:

Use HTML for rich media and video content, and use the video element to download and decode the content.Avoid interstitials. If you want to promote your app or email list, use banners rather than full-screen overlays or interstitials. Users don’t like them, and neither does Google.Consistently test your global navigation and mine internal search data to refine that navigation (based on what you see users aren’t finding). Further, remember that mega menus don’t always work well on mobile. Simply put, don’t overwhelm users with menu options when you have limited screen real estate.Do allow content and media to scale to fill device screen size, as that provides a good user experience. To help with this, stay away from absolute declarations in your CSS.Do allow all font sizes to scale, and use 16px as your base font size. Don’t require users to zoom to read, interact with or consume content. No one likes to do that.Make your tap targets at least 48 pixels wide to make them easy to hit. In addition, space your tap targets 32 pixels (or more) apart. Don’t require users to zoom to tap buttons, links or form fields.Allow common gesture features on your e-commerce site, especially pinch/double-tap to zoom. Don’t use low-resolution images that become pixelated when you zoom.Configure internal site search to make content easier to find, and actively harvest site search queries to learn more about what users are looking for on your site so that you can make navigation, layout and content improvements over time.Enable contextual keyboards that change based on required input types. Using one standard keyboard layout for all input can be difficult for users to deal with. Don’t assume the limitations of physical keywords. For example, if you’re looking for someone to enter a domain name or email address, have a “key” that they can tap to enter “.com” — these types of contextual features will save them time.Make it easy for users to convert, whether it’s via a form fill, a phone call or your shopping cart. Enable click-to-call by wrapping phone numbers with telephone schema. Don’t require more than three clicks to complete a conversion.Implement all the basics of page speed. This means things like enabling gzip compression, leveraging browser caching and getting server response time under 2oo milliseconds.Don’t use render-blocking JavaScript, especially for external scripts. Don’t use inline CSS attributes and/or a large CSS file.Don’t make the language on your site too complex. Readability is a big concern (and not just for mobile sites). To give you some perspective, here is a look at how well US adults read:

Leverage readability indexes, such as:

Flesch reading easeFlesch-Kincaid grade levelGunning Fog indexSMOG Readability formula

You can get readability measurements for your content within Microsoft Word. There are two paths to navigate to it, shown below:

Configuration-dependent auditing: Mobile subdomains

If you’re using a mobile subdomain, you will need to implement bidirectional linking, with a rel=alternate tag on your desktop pointing to your mobile site, and a rel=canonical tag pointing from your mobile site back to your desktop site. These are sometimes called switchboard tags.

A common question that many people ask is whether or not Google will want publishers to reverse the direction of those tags with the advent of the mobile-first index. To date, Google’s answer to that has been no, that this is not necessary. They will simply assume the reverse. From Google’s perspective, if they tried to get everyone to switch them, a certain amount of chaos would be likely to result.

Do minimize cross-linking, so that your default links in the mobile experience should be to other pages in the mobile experience. But you should also provide the alternative desktop experience for users who want it. One benefit is that you can monitor clicks and, if there are lots of them, it may indicate problems in your mobile experience that you need to debug.

Do say no to blanket redirects, and try to make them all one-to-one. If you have no corresponding mobile content, leave users on the desktop page.

Configuration dependent auditing: Dynamic serving

For those using dynamic serving, you will need to implement the Vary HTTP header. This will help prevent problems with users being served the wrong versions of your pages due to ISP-caching. Without this header, ISP caching may cause mobile users to get your desktop page, and vice versa.

Watch out for, and avoid, unintended content differentiation between desktop and mobile because both sites are maintained differently.

Configuration dependent auditing: Responsive

With responsive sites, make sure you’re not blocking CSS or JavaScript files from being crawled. Check for the Meta viewport tag, as it gives directions on dimensions and scaling:

Width-device-width: matches content to the physical width of the device.Initial-scale: initial zoom when visiting a page.User-scale: allows for zooming (values are “yes” and “no”).

Use a comma to separate attributes so that older browsers can parse different attributes.

Do make sure that images and videos are also responsive, but don’t allow video to scale beyond the viewport size.

Last but not least, don’t base breakpoints on specific devices. Leverage Google Analytics’ Device Report to determine whether your breakpoints are properly serving your customers most of the time.

View Leslie To’s full presentation here:

Is It the Year of Mobile Yet? By Leslie To from Search Marketing Expo – SMX

Ashley Berman Hale: Mobile Friendly IRL, Beyond Best Practices

Ashley’s focus is on how you deal with the problem if you can’t get the budget or approval to proceed with making a site mobile-friendly.

When trying to get buy-in from stakeholders, Berman Hale suggests leaning on Google documentation and sharing relevant case studies. She also suggests showing desktop vs. mobile traffic over time — even in industries that are slow in moving to mobile, your analytics data is highly likely to show a strong trend in favor of mobile over time. Related to this is the idea of looking at competitor sites in SEMrush and showing their mobile traffic over time.

For some businesses, the issue may be that they only have a small budget. If that’s your situation, consider starting small. For example, you can break down your mobile friendliness action items into more manageable parts, including:

by site section.by product.by customer.by element.

Another practical tip is to focus on getting people on board one at a time. These kinds of approaches can help you build momentum in a positive way.

In other cases, the challenge might be that the code is a hot mess, and everyone is afraid to touch anything. The incremental approach can work well here, too. For example, you can:

compress your images.figure out how to strip some CSS.implement AMP on just a few elements.

Or perhaps your role is such that you only have control over the content on the site, and not the coding side of things. You can still make a difference. You can accomplish this by thoroughly understanding the intent of people who are reading your content on mobile and making it easy for them to find what they want.

This starts with upfront research, including your keyword research. Use this to help you understand the likely user intents, and then form your content around those concepts. Structure your content to make it easy to find, and create snackable, modular elements. In addition, modify your metadata and markup to communicate what users will get by engaging with your content.

You may have people in your business who care only about brick-and-mortar sales. But local search is typically a huge driver for that, and local search often is mobile search.

The key to unraveling this is learning how to track the progression from local searches to your site and business. Setting this up can help you get what you need to show people that local (and mobile) is critical to your business.

Or, if you’re in the right business, you may be able to call in legal. Your industry may have accessibility requirements, and a solid mobile experience may simply be something that you’re required to do.

Lastly, you should always pick your battles and “choose what hill to die on.” Make sure you are making steady progress over time; the path to maximum mobile-friendliness is definitely a marathon, and not a sprint.

View Ashley Berman Hale’s full presentation here:

Mobile Friendly IRL: Beyond Best Practices By Ashely Berman Hale from Search Marketing Expo – SMX

Gary Illyes: Google’s perspective

Illyes explains that, traditionally, the Google index is based on crawls of desktop content. However, the problem Google has had is that on many sites, the desktop site would have more content on its pages than the corresponding mobile pages. This was leading to problems in search because Google would return pages to mobile users based on the content they found on the desktop pages, but the users would then get served the mobile page and the content wasn’t there.

This created frustration with the quality of Google’s results, and this ended up driving the idea of switching to a mobile-first index. What this means is that Google will crawl mobile sites and base their search index off of the content they find from that crawl.

Illyes’ message on this is: “Don’t freak out.” Google is approaching this very carefully, and they don’t yet know when a full mobile-first index will go into effect. They started experimenting with it two years ago, and it did not go well at all.

Currently, they have moved a small number of sites into a mobile-first index, and they have been monitoring those to make sure they’re not being hurt in terms of traffic and ranking as a result.

Eric’s note: Google has to be very careful about these types of changes. While they may be desirable at some level, searchers often have pretty specific things they want and need, including specific brands, and if they’ve been artificially demoted, this will also result in user frustration. This is the same reason that things like HTTPS and page speed are such weak ranking factors.

Illyes next notes that if your site is responsive, you’re good to go! But many of the sites that have other mobile configurations are not good to go.

Common issues with mobile sites are:

Some of the content and links from the desktop site may not be present.Rel=annotations may not be there (e.g., hreflang).Structured data may be missing.Some of the media and images may be missing.

Illyes then shared the example of one site that did not move over their hreflang tags, and they lost 50 percent of their traffic. This is exactly the type of thing that Google wants to avoid.

Here are the things you should do to prepare for the mobile-first index:

    If your site is responsive, you’re already ready to go.Make sure your mobile pages have all the same videos and images as your matching desktop pages.Make sure your mobile site has all the content and all the links that show up on the matching desktop pages.Make sure to implement hreflang tags on the mobile pages.Make sure to carry over the structured data from your desktop pages.

Last, but not least, don’t panic!

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Google Assistant now offering a wide range of games for kids and families

The battle of the smart speakers and home assistants is in full swing. And both Amazon and Google think that gaming and fun will help provide a competitive edge.

Amazon introduced Echo Buttons, which enable families to play Alexa-based games together, in September. Today Google announced a trove of games for families and kids: “[T]he Google Assistant now has more than 50 new games, activities and stories designed for families with kids.” They include trivia, musical chairs, storytelling and more.

Games for Google Assistant are available on Home devices, smartphones and other devices where the Assistant is available. This is also where Google seeks to compete, as a platform across more devices (“ambient computing”) than Amazon can offer.

Google has also made it possible to personalize the Assistant for kids under 13. Home devices can recognize up to six different voices. Accordingly, kids can use the same devices as their parents, but the Assistant will recognize the child’s voice and offer different options and experiences.

Parental controls are powered by “Family Link.” It’s an app that gives parents the ability to manage their kids’ Android device experiences.

Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) conquer the competition for shoe retailer

In the highly competitive footwear vertical, no season matters more than late summer, when shoppers spend $27 billion on supplies and clothing for the coming school year.

According to the Deloitte back-to-school survey for 2017, some 55 percent of that spend, about $15 billion, is devoted to clothing and accessories. Late summer may be only the second-biggest shopping season of the year in the United States, but for verticals like footwear, it’s number one.

A top shoe retailer came to Brandify (disclosure: my employer) for a solution to boost local store visibility online. To achieve the retailer’s goal, we worked in collaboration with SEO consultant Steve Wiideman to implement Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) for the retailer’s nearly 500 US stores.

The open-source AMP Project, led and heavily promoted by Google in collaboration with Twitter, WordPress, Pinterest and LinkedIn, defines a lightweight standard for publishing web pages that makes them load very quickly on mobile devices. The standard includes special implementations of HTML and JavaScript, as well as the concept of an AMP Cache, which is a repository for serving pages converted to AMP.

Google’s AMP Cache is by far the biggest, and since early 2016, Google has been featuring AMP results prominently, first at the top of the mobile SERP in “zero position,” and later in the year as part of the ordinary list of search results. Google has reported that pages converted to AMP typically load in less than half a second and use one-tenth of the data used by the same page in non-AMP format.

It would seem like a no-brainer to use AMP for local store pages, and yet the local search industry has been slow to adopt the standard. During the first phase of the AMP Project’s rollout, it was believed that AMP, with its stripped-down publishing format, was only suited to news sites and blogs, where presentation of text content is the main point of the web page.

This began to change when eBay launched 8 million AMP product pages last summer, proving that e-commerce sites could benefit from fast page loads and simplified presentation. As Brafton’s Ben Silverman wrote on his company’s blog, “The auction site’s confident leap into the world of the accelerated mobile experience proves that fast-loading, neatly formatted, easy-to-use content is the best way to drive conversions and sales.”

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We were eager to bring the benefits of AMP to our multilocation brand clients, and the shoe retailer’s request for a boost in traffic created a good opportunity. The switch to AMP involved a modest redesign of the local page layout for the brand, though because the retailer already preferred simplicity and utility in its web pages, the changes did not need to be dramatic.

The possibilities for interactive content are limited with AMP, and the presentation must remain simple, but developers and brands should not shy away from AMP for that reason. After all, quick access to relevant information is what mobile searchers want.

This supposition was borne out by the results for the shoe retailer. Even though AMP implementation by itself is not considered to be a ranking factor, the improvement in page design and load time correlated with a notable increase in session traffic.

Comparing the 20-day periods before and after the launch of pages converted to AMP on July 27 of this year, we saw an increase, period-over-period, of 32 percent in overall session traffic. What’s more, the impact was noticeable almost immediately on July 28, one day after launch.

Screenshot of Google Analytics showing AMP deployment on July 27 and subsequent spike in sessions.

The year-over-year results were even more dramatic, with sessions increasing 45 percent between July 28 and August 17, 2017 over the same period in 2016. Other factors may have contributed to this increase, but the immediate jump in traffic upon AMP launch is hard to deny as evidence of AMP as an isolated and significant contributor.

We also examined the retailer’s Google My Business (GMB) Insights and found a possible add-on effect. Greater prominence of local pages for the retailer seems to correlate with increased views and actions on Google listings for the brand.

Comparing the 20 days before and after launch, we saw a 9.4 percent increase in customer actions for the retailer’s Google listings, such as clicking to visit the brand website, requesting directions and clicking to call. Moreover, comparing the first 20 days after the launch of pages converted to AMP to the same period one year before, we measured a 21.3 percent increase in customer actions.

GMB Insights for shoe retailer shown in the Brandify dashboard

The implication of this result is that Google can connect pages hosted within its own AMP Cache with their corresponding website links in a store’s GMB listing. Performance of one’s business website is a known ranking factor for local listings, and AMP appears to be a great weapon for boosting local as well as organic results.

The retailer benefited significantly from the switch to AMP over a remarkably short period of time, ensuring the brand would remain at the forefront of consumer attention during the competitive back-to-school season. During the time period of the AMP campaign launch, no other significant changes were made to the retailer’s local campaign, so we feel we can claim with confidence that barring any external factors, AMP was the major driver of the positive results we measured.


Want to learn more about this case study and others related to AMP? Join us in New York for our SMX East search marketing conference, and be sure check out the “AMP: Do or die?” session, featuring the author.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Echo and Home will probably have to tell you they're always listening — in Europe

A number of Google Home Mini devices that were distributed to members of the press had a defect that caused them to record everything being said around them. This discovery renewed privacy concerns surrounding smart speakers as surreptitious listening devices in our homes.

The problem was first discovered by Android Police. Once being notified, Google investigated and fixed the issue:

The Google Home team is aware of an issue impacting a small number of Google Home Mini devices that could cause the touch control mechanism to behave incorrectly. We immediately rolled out a software update on October 7 to mitigate the issue.

Who is affected: People who received an early release Google Home Mini device at recent Made by Google events. Pre-ordered Google Home Mini purchases aren’t affected.

As a general matter, Google Home and Amazon Alexa devices must “listen” to surrounding conversations to capture “wake words” (e.g.,”Alexa,” “OK Google”) that activate them. Some privacy advocates have sounded alarms about this and expressed concern that these devices could be abused by unscrupulous law enforcement or other malevolent state actors (see Orwell’s Telescreen).

In a well-publicized criminal case in Arkansas, local prosecutors sought recordings on an Amazon Echo in a murder investigation. Amazon fought to prevent authorities from getting access to these recordings without a warrant. The defendant in the case ultimately consented to the release of any stored data, so the warrant issue was never formally ruled on by a court.

As Internet of Things devices proliferate, privacy warnings about personal data collection will intensify. It’s very likely that there will be more than 30 million smart speakers in US homes by year-end. Google and Amazon are competitively discounting and aggressively marketing them. Google’s $49 Home Mini was introduced as a low-cost answer to the Amazon Echo Dot, which Amazon just discounted to be $5 cheaper than the Mini.

These devices are also widely available in Europe, which raises the question of how they will be addressed under the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) taking effect in May 2018. Millions of smart speakers will be installed in European homes by then.

In order to process “personal data,” companies must obtain opt-in consent from users:

Consent must be clear and distinguishable from other matters and provided in an intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language. It must be as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give it.​ Explicit consent is required only for processing sensitive personal data — in this context, nothing short of “opt in” will suffice. However, for non-sensitive data, “unambiguous” consent will suffice.

It’s safe to say that these devices will be “processing sensitive personal data” and that explicit consent will be required in every case.

There’s no explicit mention of smart speakers in the GDPR documentation. However, artificial intelligence is addressed to some degree in Article 22 (“Automated individual decision-making, including profiling”), which says:

The data subject shall have the right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated processing, including profiling, which produces legal effects concerning him or her or similarly significantly affects him or her [unless explicit consent is provided].

Most consumer-facing AI technologies, including smart speakers and self-driving cars, will require explicit opt-in consent in Europe. For Echo or Home, it might be as simple as a verbal statement played upon setup, which asks for the owner to OK use of his or her personal data. Alternatively, there might need to be ongoing or periodic disclosures and consent.

There’s currently a lack of clarity about what will be specifically required from smart speaker makers. We’ll likely see some guidance, however, from the EU or NGOs in the next several months. The consumer question will be: how do I feel about a third-party recording device in my home?

AMP up your call conversions: 5 things you need to know

In Google’s world, site speed matters. And the search giant is pushing hard on AMP, its open source initiative to improve web page speed and performance for mobile users. But that speed comes at a cost for digital marketers. AMP eliminates scripts — including the scripts that help you track mobile calls.

Join Eric Enge and other AMP experts as they explore AMP’s pros and cons, as well as how leading technology providers are helping marketers identify AMP visitor sessions and track call sources. Implementing AMP doesn’t have to mean losing call tracking and attribution capabilities.

Register today for “5 Steps to AMP Up Your Call Conversions,” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by CallTrackingMetrics.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Pick up the phone: Your best customer is on the line.

Marketers cannot ignore offline channels. Customers no longer see a difference between digital and physical. In fact, in this age of digital connectivity, inbound phone calls are on the rise. And it is often these customers who call directly to a business are a marketer’s most valuable asset.

In May 2017, Marchex commissioned Forrester Consulting to examine how customers who initiate an inbound call during the customer journey perform against those who do not. Through an online survey of 213 marketing decision makers in the US, we found that the phone customer converts faster, spends more and churns less.

Learn more. Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “Pick Up The Phone: Your Best Customer Is On The Line.”